Dr Michell Ruiz

Dr Michell Ruiz
Cirugía de hombro y del Manguito rotador

lunes, 30 de septiembre de 2013

Self-managed loaded exercise versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy


http://www.physiospot.com/research/self-managed-loaded-exercise-versus-usual-physiotherapy-treatment-for-rotator-cuff-tendinopathy/

Self-managed loaded exercise versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy

Self-managed loaded exercise versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy
Rotator cuff tendinopathy is often the cause of shoulder pain characterised by persistent and/or recurrent problems for a proportion of sufferers. The authors’ objective in this study was to pilot the methods proposed to conduct a substantive study to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-managed loaded exercise programme as opposed to usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy. They conducted a single-centre pragmatic unblinded parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial at one private physiotherapy clinic, northern England. 24 individuals with rotator cuff tendinopathy were recruited.
The intervention was a programme of self-managed loaded exercise. The control group received usual physiotherapy treatment. Baseline assessment comprised the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Short-Form 36, repeated three months after randomisation. The recruitment target was met and the majority of participants (98%) were willing to be randomised. 100% retention was attained with all participants completing the SPADI at three months. Exercise adherence rates were excellent (90%). The mean change in SPADI score was -23.7 (95% CI -14.4 to -33.3) points for the self-managed exercise group and -19.0 (95% CI -6.0 to -31.9) points for the usual physiotherapy treatment group. The difference in three month SPADI scores was 0.1 (95% CI -16.6 to 16.9) points in favour of the usual physiotherapy treatment group.
The authors concluded that in keeping with past research which suggest the need for further study of self-managed loaded exercise for rotator cuff tendinopathy, these methods and the preliminary evaluation of outcome offer a foundation and stimulus to undertake a substantive study.
- See more at: http://www.physiospot.com/research/self-managed-loaded-exercise-versus-usual-physiotherapy-treatment-for-rotator-cuff-tendinopathy/#sthash.f9Y7NrC8.dpuf

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23954024


 2013 Aug 14. pii: S0031-9406(13)00059-X. doi: 10.1016/j.physio.2013.06.001. [Epub ahead of print]

Self-managed loaded exercise versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

Source

School of Health & Related Research, University of Sheffield, Regent Court, 30 Regent Street, Sheffield S1 4DA, UK. Electronic address: c.littlewood@sheffield.ac.uk.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a common source of shoulder pain characterised by persistent and/or recurrent problems for a proportion of sufferers. The aim of this study was to pilot the methods proposed to conduct a substantive study to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-managed loaded exercise programme versus usual physiotherapy treatment for rotator cuff tendinopathy.

DESIGN:

A single-centre pragmatic unblinded parallel group pilot randomised controlled trial.

SETTING:

One private physiotherapy clinic, northern England.

PARTICIPANTS:

Twenty-four participants with rotator cuff tendinopathy.

INTERVENTIONS:

The intervention was a programme of self-managed loaded exercise. The control group received usual physiotherapy treatment.

MAIN OUTCOMES:

Baseline assessment comprised the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Short-Form 36, repeated three months post randomisation.

RESULTS:

The recruitment target was met and the majority of participants (98%) were willing to be randomised. 100% retention was attained with all participants completing the SPADI at three months. Exercise adherence rates were excellent (90%). The mean change in SPADI score was -23.7 (95% CI -14.4 to -33.3) points for the self-managed exercise group and -19.0 (95% CI -6.0 to -31.9) points for the usual physiotherapy treatment group. The difference in three month SPADI scores was 0.1 (95% CI -16.6 to 16.9) points in favour of the usual physiotherapy treatment group.

CONCLUSIONS:

In keeping with previous research which indicates the need for further evaluation of self-managed loaded exercise for rotator cuff tendinopathy, these methods and the preliminary evaluation of outcome offer a foundation and stimulus to conduct a substantive study.
Copyright © 2013 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise, Quality of life, Randomised controlled trial, Rehabilitation, Rotator cuff tendinopathy
PMID:
 
23954024
 
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario en la entrada